Jump to content
Tine

Anti-Racism ressources (for white people)

Recommended Posts

Lizzie
Posted

Thank you for sharing these resources Tine! I think it's great to have a space where we can easily find (and recommend!) material on racism and how to be actively anti-racist. 

Last night I watched 13th on Netflix, which is a really interesting documentary on slavery, racial injustice, and police brutality in the U.S. I learned a lot from watching it, and the documentary has been made available to watch for free even if you don't have a Netflix account. Highly recommended! 

 

Lizzie
Posted

Thank you @Candy! I've heard of some of these, but not watched any yet - definitely a great place to start. I'll watch one of these tonight! 

Tine
Posted

I want to add MrsKevOnStage and KevOnStage to the above list. I did follow him for a while already. Listen, learn, laugh. Now I follow her too, and I became a Patreon. There's also relationship advice in there. 

One thing I'd like to add is the line between tone policing and liking people. If you start looking, there are plenty of BIPOC voices out there. Listen to the ones you love from areas you are interested in but not only to the topics you are comfortable with presented in ways you are comfortable with. We are here to challenge ourselves, to crack open and learn.

That brings me to something related. Sometimes we need to relax and recover, but that doesn't need to be a reason to let the ball drop. Find an area you are passionate about and ask yourself how white supremacy is at play there and then consciously look beyond. I love reading, and my favourite genre is SciFi. For most of my life, it seemed to me like great SciFi books are written by white men, and I didn't question that for a long time - not as a woman and not as a white person. Until I first consciously looked for female writers and then for black female writers. As I asked in this thread to stick to recommendations you have the first-hand experience with I can recommend N.K. Jemisin and Octavia E. Butler.

Tine
Posted

I found a racism scale online which was useful for me as a white person.

Trigger warning for BIPOC - to showcase the different points on the scale it does include racist statements.

That why I am sharing the link not the scale directly: https://racismscale.weebly.com/

Lizzie
Posted

An amazing TEDx Talk by Mena Fombo who started the the international campaign “No. You Cannot Touch My Hair” that I highly recommend! 

 

 

Tine
Posted

As 13th is not suitable for a 9 year old I was looking for other movies where Ava DuVernay was involved. She's the director/ producer of 13th, Queen Sugar, Selma, When they see us, Middle of Nowhere and more. As a result family movie night yesterday was "A wrinkle in time", which she directed as well and where the main character is a black girl.

Tine
Posted

I recommend Rachel Ricketts. You can find her on Insight Timer for example with "Stepping into spiritual activism" for a first impression, on Instagram and in several podcasts. Like "Red Lips & Eyerolls" or "the balanced blonde". Here's a quote about Covid-19: "Oppressed identities live in really challenging times - all the f***ing time.* or white folx starting their anti-racism journey with her "I am glad you are here AND you are late. This is not a shame-evoking statement but a fact we need to acknowledge when doing the work". She is also on Patreon.

Listening to her was insightful, motivating, empowering and with the directness and clarity that I really appreciate.

She also offers 2 courses on her website "Spiritual activism 101 & 102". (which I haven't taken yet) The first course is for everyone the second has 2 versions:

- "This online workshop is carefully curated for White and White-passing folks, particularly White womxn, to continue the sacred and spiritual conversation required for radical racial justice."

- "This online workshop is carefully curated for POCs ONLY, particularly black + brown womxn, to continue the sacred and spiritual conversation required for healing our internalized oppression and racial trauma."

Lizzie
Posted

I was also recommended this Netflix special with Dave Chapelle. It's called 8:46 and it's available for free on YouTube if you don't have a Netflix account. I'll include the video here if anyone wants to check it out, I'll be watching it later today too! 

 

Lizzie
Posted

Another really interesting TEDx Talk about racism in the U.S. by Brittany Barron, who argues that the problem is the nation's "expertise" in racism.

 

Candy
Posted

I saw this video today and thought it appropriate to share here. 

 

Candy
Posted

3 anti-racism meditations by two friends with different racial backgrounds, now available on Soundcloud. Very nicely done.

Lizzie
Posted

 

I've been meaning to share the YouTube channel called 'Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man' by Emmanuel Acho. He shares short videos where he discuss race in relation to different topics such as relationships, white parents raising black children, religion, etc. In this first episode he is trying to educate and inform about racism, system racism and social injustice. Check it out! 

Tine
Posted

Screenshot(171).pngI just finished listening to "How to be an AntiRacist" by Ibram X. Kendi. Such an insightful book. The audiobook is read by himself, which makes it even more tangible. He mixes his journey of becoming more and more antiracist with historical events and broad theories. Hence, as a listener, we get the full bandwidth of a personal story to the theoretical understanding.


"How to Be an Antiracist" is a book for literally everybody because racism left none of us untouched and only by learning more about it we can start to see it for what it is and then decide to think and act differently. This book is intense and honest and powerful, and I am grateful that he looked deep into the pain to make it easier for the readers.

Yet even with his support, the hard part is recognizing the racist thoughts and behaviours in ourselves. Especially realizing that there are so many layers that every time we face the pain and shame guilt of one layer and peel it of there are plenty of others yet undetected.
We quickly tell ourselves that we have done enough, and we are good people, and there are many more who are not even as far as we are.

The scope of this book, the work, this journey is that it will never be enough, and that's tough. Yet every racist idea (around us and within ourselves) we manage to realize, analyze and see for what it is is getting us a step closer to a world of respect, solidarity and support for everyone.


×
×
  • Create New...