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Anti-Racism ressources (for white people)


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Lizzie
Posted

Thank you for sharing these resources Tine! I think it's great to have a space where we can easily find (and recommend!) material on racism and how to be actively anti-racist. 

Last night I watched 13th on Netflix, which is a really interesting documentary on slavery, racial injustice, and police brutality in the U.S. I learned a lot from watching it, and the documentary has been made available to watch for free even if you don't have a Netflix account. Highly recommended! 

 

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Lizzie
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Thank you @Candy! I've heard of some of these, but not watched any yet - definitely a great place to start. I'll watch one of these tonight! 

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I want to add MrsKevOnStage and KevOnStage to the above list. I did follow him for a while already. Listen, learn, laugh. Now I follow her too, and I became a Patreon. There's also relationship advice in there. 

One thing I'd like to add is the line between tone policing and liking people. If you start looking, there are plenty of BIPOC voices out there. Listen to the ones you love from areas you are interested in but not only to the topics you are comfortable with presented in ways you are comfortable with. We are here to challenge ourselves, to crack open and learn.

That brings me to something related. Sometimes we need to relax and recover, but that doesn't need to be a reason to let the ball drop. Find an area you are passionate about and ask yourself how white supremacy is at play there and then consciously look beyond. I love reading, and my favourite genre is SciFi. For most of my life, it seemed to me like great SciFi books are written by white men, and I didn't question that for a long time - not as a woman and not as a white person. Until I first consciously looked for female writers and then for black female writers. As I asked in this thread to stick to recommendations you have the first-hand experience with I can recommend N.K. Jemisin and Octavia E. Butler.

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  • Moderator
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I found a racism scale online which was useful for me as a white person.

Trigger warning for BIPOC - to showcase the different points on the scale it does include racist statements.

That why I am sharing the link not the scale directly: https://racismscale.weebly.com/

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  • Moderator
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An amazing TEDx Talk by Mena Fombo who started the the international campaign “No. You Cannot Touch My Hair” that I highly recommend! 

 

 

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As 13th is not suitable for a 9 year old I was looking for other movies where Ava DuVernay was involved. She's the director/ producer of 13th, Queen Sugar, Selma, When they see us, Middle of Nowhere and more. As a result family movie night yesterday was "A wrinkle in time", which she directed as well and where the main character is a black girl.

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I recommend Rachel Ricketts. You can find her on Insight Timer for example with "Stepping into spiritual activism" for a first impression, on Instagram and in several podcasts. Like "Red Lips & Eyerolls" or "the balanced blonde". Here's a quote about Covid-19: "Oppressed identities live in really challenging times - all the f***ing time.* or white folx starting their anti-racism journey with her "I am glad you are here AND you are late. This is not a shame-evoking statement but a fact we need to acknowledge when doing the work". She is also on Patreon.

Listening to her was insightful, motivating, empowering and with the directness and clarity that I really appreciate.

She also offers 2 courses on her website "Spiritual activism 101 & 102". (which I haven't taken yet) The first course is for everyone the second has 2 versions:

- "This online workshop is carefully curated for White and White-passing folks, particularly White womxn, to continue the sacred and spiritual conversation required for radical racial justice."

- "This online workshop is carefully curated for POCs ONLY, particularly black + brown womxn, to continue the sacred and spiritual conversation required for healing our internalized oppression and racial trauma."

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I was also recommended this Netflix special with Dave Chapelle. It's called 8:46 and it's available for free on YouTube if you don't have a Netflix account. I'll include the video here if anyone wants to check it out, I'll be watching it later today too! 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • Moderator
Posted

Another really interesting TEDx Talk about racism in the U.S. by Brittany Barron, who argues that the problem is the nation's "expertise" in racism.

 

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  • Moderator
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I saw this video today and thought it appropriate to share here. 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • Moderator
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3 anti-racism meditations by two friends with different racial backgrounds, now available on Soundcloud. Very nicely done.

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I've been meaning to share the YouTube channel called 'Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man' by Emmanuel Acho. He shares short videos where he discuss race in relation to different topics such as relationships, white parents raising black children, religion, etc. In this first episode he is trying to educate and inform about racism, system racism and social injustice. Check it out! 

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  • Moderator
Posted
On 6/9/2020 at 12:08 PM, Lizzie said:

Last night I watched 13th on Netflix, which is a really interesting documentary on slavery, racial injustice, and police brutality in the U.S.

@Lizzie Thank you for the recommendation. This weekend we finally watched 13th, and it was shocking how the dots connected into such an inhuman and alarmingly adaptable system of oppression. It's hard and necessary to watch even if I am in Europe because understanding the system is the only way to recognize and dismantle it everywhere.

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  • Moderator
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I finished Layla F. Saad's book "Me and white supremacy".
It took me quite some time to work through it and that I even had a choice in when to do my anti-racism homework and when not shows my privilege.
Fifty-eight handwritten pages of personal notes, peeling off layer by layer ranging from white fragility and anti-blackness to white silence and apathy. The 28 chapters in the book each look at a different aspect of white supremacy. They invite us to do our work and reflect on our part in all of it. It's hard, frustrating, infuriating, sad and exhausting and it's worth every second because staying in comfortable ignorance is just another form of exploitation and suppression a world worth living in can't tolerate anymore.

 

If you want to talk about racism and also not put the emotional labour of this work on your BIPOC friends I am offering a weekly meeting where we discuss this book and related topics.

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  • Moderator
Posted

Not a resource but rather an example of checking oneself:

In a meeting, I just said "chop chop" humorously to my teammates. The moment I said it I felt this tiny pinch, something to easily brush of but instead I googled "Is chop chop racist?". It turns out it's rather classist slightly obnoxious command to hurry up. While I doubt that my teammate understood it that way with the background info I have now it's simply not what I wanted to say or who I want to be. So next time I'll go for something like "Have a happy and productive week!" 

Language matters - educating oneself matters.

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Candy
Posted

Here's an essential reading guide for fighting racism:

 

And also, an entire Google doc of resources from Ashely Adams, CEO of Black Yoga Magazine. Her website is a gold mine of education and ways to support anti-racism.

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Lizzie
Posted

 

I found this TedTalk by Melanie Funchess on implicit bias really powerful. Lots of takeaways and empowering solutions - highly recommend! 

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  • Moderator
Posted

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(Alice Hasters - What white people don't want to hear about racism but should know)

 

Here's a book I recently read, and it points towards another critical aspect of educating ourselves. Like all types of fascism tend to be measured against Nazi Germany, a similar thing seems to happen with explicit racism like Apartheid in South Africa or Jim Crow in The USA. Compared to these laws racism didn't exist in Germany and therefore, Germany doesn't have a problem with racism. Or people might find the excuse that "Racism exists, but it only exists somewhere else, and here it's not that bad." Of cause that is wrong. Racism and white supremacy as rooted in colonialism have infected the whole planet, but they are sneaky and white people (including myself) are excellent at finding excuses. That's why this book is so essential for me as a white German person. Here I witness the connection of racism and white supremacy as it appears worldwide and how it manifests in Germany and how an Afrogerman person's lived experience is.
I encourage everyone to expand their research to people's experience in your communities, in your area, in your country. In the fight against racism, it is essential that we see what we (white people) can't see and therefore, we need to listen and educate ourselves.

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  • Moderator
Tine
Posted

Exit_Racism_Packshots-p-800.jpeg

Yes, I read another book about the topic of racism by an afro-german woman: Tupoka Ogette - Exit Racism

I keep learning. While open, blatant racism has never really been a problem to detect the nuances and facets of racial stereotypes and microaggressions, we - as white people - need to learn and practice. They are so "normal" and "harmless" to us (and only us). White toxicity (white supremacy isn't the right word as there's nothing supreme about whiteness) disguises itself so well that nothing will happen without actively educating ourselves and working to dismantle it.

The international woman's day was on the 8th of March. I also want to use this entry as a reminder of the importance of intersectional feminism. White women know oppression by patriarchy and are also benefiting from white privilege. This privilege needs to be used to lift woman up who don't.

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  • Members
Posted

I have seen the weekly event here on happiness.com to learn from anti-racist ressources like "me and white supremacy". Here's a link to more workshops to deepen and actively engage in anti-racist work as a white person.

Unfortunately I missed out on Dr. Robin DiAngelo's event but her book "White Fragility" is on my reading list.

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